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    Construction Expert Witness Builders Information
    Hurst, Illinois

    Illinois Builders Right To Repair Current Law Summary:

    Current Law Summary: HB4873 Pending: The Notice and Opportunity to Repair Act provides that a construction professional shall be liable to a homeowner for damages caused by the acts or omissions of the professional and his or her agents, employees, or subcontractors. This bill requires the service of notice to the professional of the complained-of defect in the construction by the homeowner prior to commencement of a lawsuit. Allows the professional to make an offer of repair or settlement and to rescind this offer if the claimant fails to respond within 30 days.


    Construction Expert Witness Contractors Licensing
    Guidelines Hurst Illinois

    No state license required for general contracting. License required for roofing.


    Construction Expert Witness Contractors Building Industry
    Association Directory
    Home Builders Association of Greater Fox Valley
    Local # 1431
    PO Box 1146
    Saint Charles, IL 60174

    Hurst Illinois Construction Expert Witness 10/ 10

    Northern Illinois Home Builders Association Inc
    Local # 1434
    3695 Darlene Ct Ste 102
    Aurora, IL 60504

    Hurst Illinois Construction Expert Witness 10/ 10

    Home Builders Association of Greater Chicago
    Local # 1425
    5999 S. New Wilke Rd Ste 104
    Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

    Hurst Illinois Construction Expert Witness 10/ 10

    SouthWest Suburban Home Builders Association
    Local # 1432
    10767 W 163rd Pl
    Orland Park, IL 60467

    Hurst Illinois Construction Expert Witness 10/ 10

    Home Builders Association of the Greater Rockford Area
    Local # 1465
    631 N Longwood St Suite 102
    Rockford, IL 61107

    Hurst Illinois Construction Expert Witness 10/ 10

    Home Builders Association of Kankakee
    Local # 1445
    221 S Schuyler Ave Ste B
    Kankakee, IL 60901

    Hurst Illinois Construction Expert Witness 10/ 10

    Home Builders Association of Greater Peoria
    Local # 1455
    1599 N Main Street
    East Peoria, IL 61611

    Hurst Illinois Construction Expert Witness 10/ 10


    Construction Expert Witness News and Information
    For Hurst Illinois


    U.S. Housing Starts Top Forecast on Single-Family Homes

    Utah’s Highest Court Holds That Plaintiffs Must Properly Commence an Action to Rely on the Relation-Back Doctrine to Overcome the Statute of Repose

    Understanding Lien Waivers

    Architect Not Responsible for Injuries to Guests

    Did Deutsche Make a Deal with the Wrong Homeowner?

    Federal Court Asks South Dakota Supreme Court to Decide Whether Injunction Costs Are “Damages,” Adopts Restatement’s Position on Providing “Inadequate” Defense

    Ill-fated Complaint Fails to State Claims Against Broker and FEMA

    Court of Appeal Shines Light on Collusive Settlement Agreements

    Court Extends Insurer Rights to Equitable Contribution

    Law Firm Settles Two Construction Defect Suits for a Combined $4.7 Million

    Philadelphia Court Rejects Expert Methodology for Detecting Asbestos

    Hurricane Harvey: Understanding the Insurance Aspects, Immediate Actions for Risk Managers

    A New Statute of Limitations on Construction Claims by VA State Agencies?

    Remediation Work Caused by Installation of Defective Tiles Not Covered

    Insurance Client Alert: Denial of Summary Judgment Does Not Automatically Establish Duty to Defend

    Pending Sales of U.S. Existing Homes Rise Most in Four Years

    Insured's Expert Qualified, Judgment for Coverage Affirmed

    U.S. Supreme Court Limits the Powers of the Nation’s Bankruptcy Courts

    Affirmed: Nationwide Acted in Bad Faith by Failing to Settle Within Limits

    Nevada HOA Criminal Investigation Moving Slowly

    Renters ‘Sold Out’ by NYC Pensions Press Mayor on Housing

    Withdrawal Liability? Read your CBA

    Insured's Motion for Reconsideration on Protecting the Integrity of Referral Sources under Florida Statute s. 542.335

    Following My Own Advice

    Greystone on Remand Denies Insurer's Motion for Summary Judgment To Bar Coverage For Construction Defects

    Decaying U.S. Roads Attract Funds From KKR to DoubleLine

    Apple to Open Steve Jobs-Inspired Ring-Shaped Campus in April

    In Real Life the Bad Guy Sometimes Gets Away: Adding Judgment Debtors to a Judgment

    Colorado homebuilders target low-income buyers with bogus "affordable housing" bill

    Hotel Claims Construction Defect Could Have Caused Collapse

    OSHA Begins Enforcement of its Respirable Crystalline Silica in Construction Standard. Try Saying That Five Times Real Fast

    Fannie-Freddie Propose Liquidity Rules for Mortgage Insurers

    Manhattan’s Property Boom Pushes Landlords to Sell Early

    Housing Starts in U.S. Slumped More Than Forecast in March

    California Court of Appeal Clarifies Intent of Faulty Workmanship Exclusions

    ADA Lawsuits Spur Renovation Work in Fresno Area

    Construction Defect Claim not Barred by Prior Arbitration

    Court Slams the Privette Door on Independent Contractor’s Bodily Injury Claim

    Pollution Exclusion Bars Coverage for Damage Caused by Tar Escaping From Roof

    PA Supreme Court to Rule on Scope of Judges' Credibility Determinations

    Time to Repair Nevada’s Construction Defect Laws?

    LAX Runway Lawsuit a Year Too Late?

    Home Buyers Lose as U.S. Bond Rally Skips Mortgage Rates

    You Are Your Brother’s Keeper. Direct Contractors in California Now Responsible for Wage Obligations of Subcontractors

    Guidance for Structural Fire Engineering Making Its Debut

    Design Professional Asserting Copyright Infringement And Contributory Copyright Infringement

    Quick Note: Remember to Timely Foreclose Lien Against Lien Transfer Bond

    Nevada Assembly Sends Construction Defect Bill to Senate

    Bad Faith Claim for Investigation Fails

    Building Codes Evolve With High Wind Events
    Corporate Profile

    HURST ILLINOIS CONSTRUCTION EXPERT WITNESS
    DIRECTORY AND CAPABILITIES

    The Hurst, Illinois Construction Expert Witness Group is comprised from a number of credentialed construction professionals possessing extensive trial support experience relevant to construction defect and claims matters. Leveraging from more than 25 years experience, BHA provides construction related trial support and expert services to the nation's most recognized construction litigation practitioners, Fortune 500 builders, commercial general liability carriers, owners, construction practice groups, and a variety of state and local government agencies.

    Construction Expert Witness News & Info
    Hurst, Illinois

    The Business of Engineering: An Interview with Matthew Loos

    July 15, 2019 —
    Matthew Loos is an experienced project manager in the civil engineering industry. He works as a project engineer at Jones|Carter in Fort Worth, Texas. In this interview, we discuss Matt’s new book, The Business of Engineering. It is not very common that an engineer writes a non-technical book. What inspired you to do so? Have you ever gotten an idea stuck in your head that you just couldn’t let go of? A time when you couldn’t go to sleep because the idea was consistently begging for your attention? That’s what happened to me. The idea for this book hits me right before bed, as most good ideas do. I couldn’t go to sleep after the idea struck me. I spent half of the night writing the chapters of this book in my mind. I had been thinking about the idea of engineering and how it relates to other career fields, even the non-technical ones. I was disenchanted with the trifling number of classes I took that prepared me for the business world. These were the initial thoughts that eventually led me down the road into thinking about engineering as a profession going forward. Read the court decision
    Read the full story...
    Reprinted courtesy of Aarni Heiskanen, AEC Business
    Mr. Heiskanen may be contacted at aec-business@aepartners.fi

    The Firm Hits the 9 Year Mark!

    July 22, 2019 —
    It was 9 years ago today that I announced the formation and start of my solo practice, The Law Office of Christopher G. Hill, PC. Back then, my children were in elementary and middle school. Now I have two college students, one at Appalachian State University (with a budding photography talent that has provided some photos for this blog (including that on this post)) and the other at West Virginia University, and a rising high school junior. In just the past year I began a tenure on the Section Council Virginia Bar Association Construction and Public Contracts Law section and chair of its Legislative Committee where I assisted in the drafting of the change in the mechanic’s lien form that takes effect today.. I was named to both the Virginia Business Magazine Legal Elite in Construction Law and for a 3rd consecutive year to Virginia Super Lawyers in Construction Litigation. I spoke on how to deal with a DPOR complaint this past November at the 39th Annual Construction Law and Public Contracts seminar (one I highly recommend for any lawyer interested in construction). Read the court decision
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    Reprinted courtesy of The Law Office of Christopher G. Hill
    Mr. Hill may be contacted at chrisghill@constructionlawva.com

    The Advantages of Virtual Reality in Construction

    August 20, 2019 —
    Virtual realty provides an unparalleled spatial sense for visualization at a lower cost than full-scale replicas. Today, VR is being used heavily in preconstruction to align owner expectations and educate design team stakeholders. For those already employing BIM solutions, coordination can be made much more effective by leveraging existing design models with very little added cost. As anyone who has tried a VR headset before can attest, the ability to accurately perceive spatial relationships in design cannot be replicated through traditional 2D media such as screens or paper. VR solutions also have the ability to iterate rapidly. These technologies are linked to BIM, providing real-time feedback as the design changes. This is in stark contrast to traditional full-scale mockups and offline renders, which are cumbersome and time-consuming to update with design changes. Substantial benefits without a hefty price tag Budget limitations and ROI are always a concern with emerging technology. Fortunately, VR comes cheaply with BIM production. These solutions are significantly less expensive than full-scale mockups and far more efficient when compared to longhand sequencing explanations and esoteric detailing of complex designs. Even the most elaborate VR setups are a fraction of overall construction cost, ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars depending on the level of adoption. Reprinted courtesy of Spivey Lipsey, Construction Executive, a publication of Associated Builders and Contractors. All rights reserved. Read the court decision
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    Reprinted courtesy of

    Environmental Roundup – May 2019

    July 09, 2019 —
    Federal Courts of Appeal Dam Claims Collapse On May 7, 2019, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit decided the case of Navelski, et al. v. International Paper Company. After a major storm, a dam constructed by International Paper to serve the operations of its local paper mill, was breached, releasing millions of gallons of water into a nearby creek resulting in the flooding of many homes located downstream from the creek. IP was sued by the homeowners in a class action, alleging negligence and strict liability for conducting an abnormally dangerous activity. The trial court dismissed the strict liability claim, and the jury found IP was not negligent in the operation of the dam. On appeal, the court upheld the jury verdict, agreeing that the verdict was supported by the evidence heard by the jury. The appeals court also agreed that the strict liability claim was properly dismissed as a matter of law because the operation of this dam was not an abnormally dangerous activity under Florida law. The plaintiffs had also argued that the jury should not have been advised that the home county, Escambia County, has applied for a FEMA grant which apparently made the case that some of the downstream homes were naturally prone to flooding. A redacted version of the application was allowed to be shown to the jury, but the appeals court held that the plaintiffs had not demonstrated that the court ruling was prejudicial. Read the court decision
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    Reprinted courtesy of Anthony B. Cavender, Pillsbury
    Mr. Cavender may be contacted at anthony.cavender@pillsburylaw.com

    Insurer’s Confession Of Judgment Through Post-Lawsuit Payment

    June 25, 2019 —
    The recent opinion in the property insurance coverage dispute, Bryant v. Geovera Specialty Ins. Co., 44 Fla.L.Weekly D1232a (Fla. 4thDCA 2019), discusses the doctrine known as an insurer’s “confession of judgment.” In this case, an insured suffered water damage from a pipe leak. The insurer paid the insured $6,000 because of sublimits in the property insurance policy. There was a $5,000 sublimit for mold and a $1,000 sublimit for water leakage that occurs over a period of 14 days or more. The insured sued the insurer for covered water damage arguing that the sublimits did not apply. After the lawsuit was filed, an agreed order was entered that stayed the case pending an appraisal. The appraisal award did not apply the $1,000 sublimit to the water damage from the pipe leak and segregated out damage for mold. (The insurer already paid the mold sublimit). The insurer ended up paying the appraisal award for the water damage caused by the pipe leak after deducting its pre-lawsuit sublimit payment. The insurer paid the award and did NOT challenge the application of the $1,000 sublimit in court, although it could have since coverage issues are decided by courts. Read the court decision
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    Reprinted courtesy of David Adelstein, Kirwin Norris, P.A.
    Mr. Adelstein may be contacted at dma@kirwinnorris.com

    3 Common Cash Flow Issues That Plague The Construction Industry

    August 20, 2019 —
    The construction industry has its fair share of serious cash flow problems. The nature of the industry with long periods between billing and collection, the unpredictability of some business factors, and even the day-to-day decisions of stakeholders have a huge effect on cash reserves. So how can you protect your business from these cash flow problems? Having a greater awareness of the most common cash flow problems is the key to maintaining your financial stability. Here are some of the top cash flow issues that construction companies need to watch out for. 1. Uncontrolled business growth The growth of a business as a cash flow problem sounds unintuitive. It is supposed to be a positive thing. So how could it hurt your construction business? When it goes out of control. During the growth phase, the company will need to expand its operations to meet the increasing demand. This means renting a larger office space, hiring more staff, and buying more inventory, all of which can burn through the company’s cash quickly. The more substantial the level of your growth is, the more your cash flow is affected. Growth is a good thing, but it is important to be aware of the pitfalls that you could encounter that can lead to cash flow problems. If you are dealing with a volatile growth instead of a stable one, you have to think twice before expanding your operations. A quarter with a large number of construction project deals does not guarantee the same happening in a subsequent quarter. 2. Change of scope or scope creep The scope, or the statement of work, is the foundation that guides a construction project from start to finish. It specifies all the deliverables needed by the project as agreed by all stakeholders. When the existing requirements are altered, new features are added, or project goals are changed uncontrollably, what happens is scope creep and it can hurt a company’s cash flow. Construction projects can take a long time before they are finished. A lot of factors can result in changes in the scope. There may be changes in the market strategy, market demand, and other unpredictable variables that make changes in the project requirements a necessity. These changes build up and the project may shift away from what was intended, causing delays, loss of quality, and the rise of planned costs. One way to prevent scope creep from affecting cash flow significantly is charging a fee for variations of the scope of work. However, having a solid and clear scope baseline is still the best way to combat scope creep. Reminding clients of what you signed up for by referring to the baseline is a good strategy to deal with pushy clients. 3. Payment delays and nonpayment As previously mentioned, the construction industry tends to have a lengthy period between sending an invoice and collecting payments. And if you are too passive in your collection, clients are more likely to extend pay periods and delay paying you. Unexpected delays in payment and other payment issues can have a devastating effect on companies that have little to no cash reserves. Without a cash cushion to fall back on, payment issues can threaten the existence of the business itself. If you are unable to manage your receivables, you will not have enough cash to pay the bills, pay employees, and fund your growth. Payment delays and nonpayment can happen for several reasons. They can be simple like mistakes in the invoicing or the person needed to approve the invoice is unavailable. More serious reasons like a client unsatisfied with your service or, worse, trying to scam you are also possibilities. For these reasons, it is crucial to communicate with clients properly and see if you can agree with a payment structure or pursue legal action. The construction industry operates slightly differently from other industries. Different projects produce different cash flow issues and require different strategies. By being aware of the top cash flow problems that can hurt your construction business, you will be better equipped in dealing with them in case they happen. About the Author: Patrick Hogan is the CEO of Handle, where they build software that helps contractors, subcontractors, and material suppliers secure their lien rights and get paid faster by automating the collection process for unpaid construction invoices. Read the court decision
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    Reprinted courtesy of Patrick Hogan, CEO, Handle

    Construction Reaches Half-Way Point on San Diego's $2.1 Billion Mid-Coast Trolley

    May 06, 2019 —
    Project officials for the $2.1-billion Mid-Coast Trolley in San Diego recently celebrated the halfway point of construction. The event was held at the construction staging yard near the Voigt Drive Trolley station, where workers gather for their morning briefings. Read the court decision
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    Reprinted courtesy of Greg Aragon, ENR
    ENR may be contacted at ENR.com@bnpmedia.com

    Insurers Subrogating in Arkansas Must Expend Energy to Prove That Their Insureds Have Been Made Whole

    August 06, 2019 —
    Arkansas employs the “made whole” doctrine, which requires an insured to be fully compensated for damages (i.e., to be “made whole”) before the insurer is entitled to recover in subrogation.[1] As the Riley court established, an insurer cannot unilaterally determine that its insured has been made whole (in order to establish a right of subrogation). Rather, in Arkansas, an insurer must establish that the insured has been made whole in one of two ways. First, the insurer and insured can reach an agreement that the insured has been made whole. Second, if the insurer and insured disagree on the issue, the insurer can ask a court to make a legal determination that the insured has been made whole.[2] If an insured has been made whole, the insurer is the real party in interest and must file the subrogation action in its own name.[3] However, when both the insured and an insurer have claims against the same tortfeasor (i.e., when there are both uninsured damages and subrogation damages), the insured is the real party in interest.[4] In EMC Ins. Cos. v. Entergy Ark., Inc., 2019 U.S. App. LEXIS 14251 (8th Cir. May 14, 2019), EMC Insurance Companies (EMC) filed a subrogation action in the District Court for the Western District of Arkansas alleging that its insureds’ home was damaged by a fire caused by an electric company’s equipment. EMC never obtained an agreement from the insureds or a judicial determination that its insureds had been made whole. In addition, EMC did not allege in the complaint that its insureds had been made whole and did not present any evidence or testimony at trial that its insureds had been made whole. After EMC presented its case-in-chief, the District Court ruled that EMC lacked standing to pursue its subrogation claim because “EMC failed to obtain a legal determination that its insureds had been made whole . . . prior to initiating this subrogation action.” Thus, the District Court granted Entergy Ark., Inc.’s motion for judgment as a matter of law and EMC appealed the decision. Read the court decision
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    Reprinted courtesy of Michael J. Ciamaichelo, White and Williams LLP
    Mr. Ciamaichelo may be contacted at ciamaichelom@whiteandwilliams.com